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to the 1960 debate between richard nixon and john kennedy as the first impression that each candidate made to the voters. in 2000, same thing between al gore. the split screen showing him signing to the responses of george w. bush. >> one of the things both campaigns talk about is this is a possible advantage for governor romney because there is an elevated factor for him. he is on the same stage as the president. these debates to make an impression. sometimes they have a lasting impression. often, they do not. it is an opportunity, one of the few moments in the campaign, the conventions are another, but this is the last opportunity that both candidates have to speak to such a large audience at once. >> laura meckler, thank you for being with us. we have warren decker. he is from a university in fairfax, virginia. joining us from boston, a professor alan schroeder. he has 50 years of high risk tv. what makes a good debate and a good debater? >> i think the difference between a really good debate from my standpoint, intercollegiate debate, and debates we see at the presidential level is tha
. really from 1858 until 1960, john f. kennedy versus richard nixon, debates didn't play that big a role in presidential campaigns. there were no presidential debates. but you did have in primaries occasionally, squareoffs going on. interesting to even think about stats from minnesota rarely run for president -- stacken ran for president every four years. kennedy/nixon was the game changer in debate history. people that listened to it thought nixon won on radio but on television, john f. kennedy won. nobody was that happy with the debates. we had no debates in '64 '68 '72. came back in 1976 when jimmy carter ended up doing well because of gerald ford's famous gaffe. that's the big question. can you become gaffe-free? everybody is going to be looking wednesday night to see if there was a mistake made by either person. it puts a lot of pressure on the candidates. >> jennifer: you mention nixon and kennedy and those who saw the debate felt like kennedy won. what do you think is more important? what the candida
nixon the first person i turned to was cindy quinn who -- i was 20 at the time when i took over the library. sandy was 30. we have grown up together around the library. it's a wonderful to be back. i'm glad you mentioned my friend his book will be a tremendous best seller. so if you have a chance come back. he is in fact performing in memphis the weekend after next. he has a great role in memphis which will be at the pantages. a brilliant and wonderful speaker. come out to hear him. we've been friends since we were too. rao the city to the other radio in los angeles. like to point out that we're all graduates of the university of michigan law school. different years. larry is older than i am. and is a little bit younger, but the three of us all graduated from law school. now one of us has been invited back to campus to speak. go figure. three nationally syndicated talk show hosts with a lot of audience and none of us have been invited back. every five years i invited back to harvard to be the person that this town. that the chief of staff and director of the peace corps and comm
, richard nixon, herbert hoover. who was on the blueprint. that is right. eisenhower. that was an easy one. i read that extensively and killing kennedy comes out on tuesday. thank you very much with putting up with me. 1998 bill clinton found also in one of the biggest presidential scandals the country had ever seen. >> i want you to listen to me. i'm going say this again. i did not have sexual relations with that woman. i never told anybody to lie, not a single time, never. >> bill: because of the scandal, bill clinton became a second u.s. president to be impeached. who was the first? nixon, polk, martin van burren. >> that is correct. andrew johnson. he escaped by how many votes? >> one. >> a very good. >> bill: one vote he would have been toast. alien extradition acts is most controversial u.s. laws of their time. >> in 1798 french warships seized american vessels trading with england. frightened by the possibility of invasion they passed the alien and sedition act the power to deport any alien and made citizens who criticized the government liable to arrest. >> bill: that sounds like c
-- for example, think about president reagan, he was running against the catastrophic effects of nixon's wage on price controls lasting up to 1980 and carter. the "new york times," i have to remind you, the "new york times" on the eve of the election between reagan and carter had it too close to call. lou: the third debate? >> that is right. lou: i know it's right. up next, governor romney trailing in the polls, but does history show come from behind wins are possible? as we disused, there -- discussed, there is history here. we'll have the report. are taxpayer dollars -- they call it art, but looks like obscenity to me, but there we are. we'll look at the ways in which the obama administration expresses religious sensitivity and tolerance and other ways in which had does not seem to give much of a damn. we'll talk about catth catholic league president, bill don hue and karen handle here in just moments. looking for dividend-paying stocks for your portfolio? with the fidelity stock screener, you can try strategies from independent experts and see wh criteria they use. such as a 5% yield on di
. >> oops. >> forgetting is bad, and looking bad is bad. in the very first tv debate, richard nixon refused to put on makeup. it hurt him. nixon later said -- >> more important than what you say is how you look on television. >> so campaigns obsess over details. when ronald reagan debated walter mondale, rollins and beckel were the opposing campaign managers. >> do you remember how high the podiums would be? >> days. >> we had days negotiating. >> the color of the room. >> what difference would it make to the candidate what color the room was? >> because in certain conditions, certain colors work for certain candidates. >> because mondale was shorter than reagan -- >> we wanted more distance between the two podiums. we debated between 7 1/2 feet and 9 feet for a day and a half. >> the first debate came, and reagan struggled. >> 2/3 of the defense budget pays for pay and salary -- or pay and passengers. >> he looked tired and ragged. the general observation was they just spent too much time with a 70-year-old guy trying to beat every factoid into his brain. >> people said ronald reagan is t
1972. the raging unpopular war in vietnam consumed the bitter campaign battle between president nixon and george mcgovern. suddenly on october 26th, 12 days before the election, vietnam negotiator henry kissinger made a surprise declaration believed to cement nixon's front-runner status. >> we believe that peace is at hand. >> reporter: it was the first so-called october surprise. a late in the game campaign event with a significant impact on the election. >> in order to win re-election for nixon in 1972, he needed to end the vietnam war. and this was sort of the definetive statement. >> reporter: the most famous october surprise was in 1980. 52 u.s. hostages held in iran were not released before the election despite president carter's efforts. instead they were freed as soon as rsh was inaugurated setting off democratic suspicion never proven that reagan elm sears back chanld with iran in delaying freeing the hostages and denied the troubled carter campaign a huge pre-election boost. >> it fed into the whole dynamic of the 1980 race in that jimmy carter was a stumbling ineffective pr
this is exactly what richard nixon said in his debate with jack kennedy. i share jack kennedy's mission. i share his concerns. we have the same goals. people at home are cringing, why am i giving him money, why am i voting for a guy who has the same goals as another guy. cynthia, you will probably not remember the nixon/kennedy debates, but you don't say the other guy is a good, compassionate guy and he cares about people. i do, too! that's what he's saying. i'm just like him. if you believe he's compassionate, i am too! he's selling obama. >> you say that if you don't have anything else to say, chris. another thing the bloomberg poll shows is that voters -- more voters believe that barack obama has a concrete plan for helping the middle class than believe that mitt romney has such a plan. that's another problem mitt romney has. he had expected that the economy would win the election for him. all he would have to do is go to people and say, i'm not barack obama. i can do a better job. in fact, he needed to do a lot more. obama has laid out specific proposals. he's had a job for months now, but m
rate by election day. in 1968, humphry was down 15 points to nixon. nixon won and it was by less than 1%. in 19786, there was a 34-point lead over ford. after three debates ford cut the lead to five points and led in the final gallup poll though narrowly lost. in 1980, jimmy carter had consistent advantage in the polls overarmed reagan but the final debate changed everything. polls showing a lead over romney in the key battleground states, democratic pollster who worked for jimmy carter said finding the right example can be tricky. >> we know from the exit polls and others that republicans tend to respond to the polls less than often times. from the news organizations. less than do democrats. >> in 1988, george bush managed a huge swing. dukakis was leading after the democratic convention but lost to bush. in 1992, the incumbent president was down nine points and died with bill clinton but october though clinton eventually won. former pollster questioning the assumption made in today's polls. >> these polls are assuming that you have the same high level of african-american, latino an yo
a cool handsome jack kennedy buried the nervous vice president richard nixon who turned down makeup and sweated uncontrollably. and nixon's image as a loser was driven home by questions like this. >> president eisenhower's asked to give one example of a major idea of yours that he adopted. his reply was, and i'm quoting, if you give me a week, i might think of one, i don't remember. >> i would suggest that if you know the president, that was probably a facetious remark. president president has asked for my advice. i have given it. sometimes my advice has been taken. sometimes it has not. chris: the second time a debate turned things around was ronald reagan's direct appeal to voters in his first and only faceoff with president jimmy carter. >> are you better off than you were four years ago? is it easier for you to go and buy things in the stores than it was four years ago? do you feel that our security is as safe? that we're as strong as we were four years ago? chris: after that, the next day's "new york times" told the story of how critical that became. the are you better off ques
between president nixon and george mcgovern. suddenly on october 26th, 12 days before the election, vietnam negotiator henry kissinger made a surprise declaration, believed to cement president nixon's front-runner status. >> we believe that peace is at hand. >> reporter: it was the first so-called october surprise, a late in the game campaign event with a significant impact on the election. >> in order to win re-election for nixon in 1972, they needed to end the vietnam war, and this was sort of the definitive statement. >> reporter: the most famous october surprise was in 1980, and the surprise was what did not happen. 52 u.s. hostages held in iran were not released before the election, despite president carter's efforts. instead, they were freed as soon as ronald reagan was inaugurated, setting off democratic suspicion never proven that reagan emissaries back channeled with iran to delay freeing the hostages and deny the troubled carter campaign a huge preelection boost. >> it fed into the whole dynamic of the 1980 race in the sense that jimmy carter was a stumbling, ineffective
. that was 1960, where the jfk-richard nixon debates where richard nixon appeared sweaty and uncomfortable and then 2000 where al gore was seen as sighing and sort of dismissive of then texas governor george bush. so when you asked jen and barbara whether they were giving their candidates advice on things that are aesthetic, they should be. >> that's what we all remember, right, do you wear the gray suit on black and white tv, nixon. let me ask this, because you've done a lot of work on this. super pacs and the candidates are competing for money, which a lot of people might not realize. but the campaign can cover whatever it wants with the money, the super pac not linked to the campaign at all so not ideal for the campaign. the romney campaign, $86 million raised. the pro romney super pac, $41 million. and american ross kroeds, affiliate with karl rove, $58.7 million. so you can add that up and get a big number or say if karl rove doesn't like how mitt romney does tomorrow night, he could give a lot of that $60 million, the biggest chunk of change, to, i don't know, senate candidates, cong
? the answer 1960 and the famous kennedy-nixon debate. there won't be another one until gerald ford and jimmy carter until 1976. the first presidential debate coming up wednesday. as always, both sides playing the expectations game. tamping down a little bit. let me bring back maria cardona and amy holmes. amy, as you see it, who's got the advantage, president obama who's done so many, or mitt romney who frankly had to do it just to get the nomination? >> exactly. well, the president obviously has the incumbent advantage and he's been president the last four years and dealt with these issues on the front lines at 1600 pennsylvania avenue. as you mentioned, mitt romney as the gop nominee, he had to go through quite a gauntlet. i'm not sure that one person has the edge over the other. i think the question will be, you know, who gets off the best line and who's able to address the voters' concerns most directly and most pervasively. >> maria, same question. who do you think has the edge? a lot of people have been saying, mitt, where are the details? who do you think that is advantage right now?
announcer ] humana. lou: joining us now katie microlending holding the post under nixon ford and reagan. start with "the washington post" getting the next round of sensitive documents lying on the floor in the consulate of benghazi this is outrageous. >> three weeks later we cannot send in the fbi it is too dangerous but the reporters are picking up sensitive documents talking about the people in libya. three weeks later. lou: not securing a because we have no personnel i know people in the fbi and i have the highest respect one of my oldest friends is there. the idea they make them look like in the tent and even want to continue the description to make them look horrible. >> it was either a massive intelligence failure to not know the was a security threat to and if not then a massive security failure to not protect them. either way it is now a cover up. remember the youtube movie? they said the intelligence community said it was there fault. lou: one of the where does things i have never seen comes out with the statement on a friday and has not appeared in public he could be in a rive
's got to score. >> there was a time between the famous kennedy-nixon tapes that there were no televised debates. why are they considered so vital now? >> well, the kennedy-nixon debates created so much attention in 1960. many people think that's why ted kennedy won. if you recall ford made famously the gap that -- and then certainly by 1980, ronald reagan was very behind in the polls was just able to tidal wave over jimmy carter with quips like there you go again in a sort of staged format. since 1980, they have become part of the american landscape. >> the "new york times" recently wrote about this debate prep and the president of the united states is an awesome figure merely to share the platform with him on equal terms is the gain in stature, good performance will be gauged even better. why would any president agree to participate in an event that ultimately -- the -- because it's become now a demand, president obama suddenly bailed on debates. then, you know, he would be seeming like a poor sport. and also these debates are agreed upon long before the fall season, they're everything
, if this issue really gets traction that it deserves, and let it say it deserves, go back. richard nixon was forced out of office because he lied. and because he covered some stuff up. i will be blunt and tell you this. nobody died in watergate. we have people who are dead because of this. there are questions to be answered and americans ought to demand to get answers. and it doesn't matter what the policies are. bill: you're 30 days out from here, under 40 days. how does libya factor in the national discussion? >> the bigger issue is not just what happened in libya. that is huge. the fact that an ambassador was assassinated is huge. the bigger issue, why didn't this white house, why did not this administration all of its various surrogates tell us the truth? they knew the truth. they just didn't tell it. and they have covered it up. in the same way they didn't tell us the truth about the fort hood shooter and didn't tell us the truth about the shooter in little rock who killed a soldier standing outside of a recruiting station. there is much to be held, they should be held accountable f
turn to monitor for the last couple of words. >> remember when president nixon lied about a cover-up having to do with the break-in at the democratic national committee. he was impeached. this man has been lying in the administration has been lying about the death of the u.s. ambassador. >> americans deserve answers 56 at thank you very much. i know you have more to say. that's why you'll be back sen. up next, recheck the in-box, what you're proposing an interesting way to end the united nations. that should light up your life. ♪ so... [ gasps ] these are sandra's "homemade" yummy, scrumptious bars. hmm? i just wanted you to eat more fiber. chewy, oatie, gooeyness... and fraudulence. i'm in deep, babe. you certainly are. [ male announcer ] fiber one. lou: debra wrote me on facebook, thanks mr. treasur dobbs. if you are giving me an easy way for uninonsense to end and end early, maybe if we sense the ladies from the view in, they would leave on their own, i have no further comment other than, good night from new york. neil: we get a lot of polls here at fox, but this one floored
couple of words. >> remember when president nixon lied about a cover-up having to do with the break-in at the democratic national committee. he was impeached. this man has been lying in the administration has been lying about the death of the u.s. ambassador. >> americans deserve answers 56 at thank you very much. i know you have more to say. that's why you'll be back sen. up next, recheck the in-box, what you're proposing an interesting way to end the interesting way to end the united nations.ely. but because of business people like you, things are beginning to get rolling. and regions is here to help. making it easier with the expertise and service to keep those wheels turning. from business loans to cash management, we want to be your partner moving forward. so switch to regions. and let's get going. together. lou: debra wrote me on facebook, thanks mr. treasur dobbs. if you are giving me an easy way for uninonsense to end and end early, maybe if we sense the ladies from the view in, they would leave on their own, i have no furomment other than, good night from new york. neil: we
, they did something unusual, something very nixon like and which is the extension of executive privilege. executive privilege usually protects the president and director geysers they can offer candid advice. usually that is outside the scope of congressional investigations. and of course pending national security or criminal cases. but those are the three reasons why generally you get to deny subpoena. they are just trying to cover holder. now look at the complex relationship between eric holder and the president of the united states. first of outcome that there is an incredible debt of gratitude there. early on in 2007, obama's candidacy for presidency looks like a longshot. eric holder and then deputy attorney general under clinton, came to work for his campaign. they were able to push that to donors sent to the press, see clinton's people are coming over, we do have a future. then eric holder in the course of the campaign was spared a number of key moment. reverend wright was one example, where he was able to handle the crisis in one new donations spent some in the press overcome key
of the heroism of the bystanders in portland, maine. urs la nixon broke her leg after she crashed her car into the harbor. several people you see in the pictures there they jumped into the water as the car slowly sank below the surface. nix nixon's family says she faces weeks of recovery but she's grateful to her rescuers. looked like about five people or so there, wolf, jumped in that water. i'm sure that water wasn't very warm either talking portland, maine. >> they saved her. good for them, good for her. >>> gloria borger sat down with ann romney. but first, our unsolicited advice panel is standing by. they're going to preview some key questions you're going to want to listen for in tonight's debate. [ female announcer ] what does the anti-aging power of olay total effects plus the skin perfecting color of a bb cream equal? introducing the newest trend in beauty. olay total effects cc cream. c for color. c for correction. [ female announcer ] fight 7 signs of aging with a flawlessly beautiful complexion instantly. we call it a phenomenon. you'll call it possibly the most exciting skin
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 75 (some duplicates have been removed)